Tag: Rock

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Flip Your Wig – Thursday: A Retrospective

Welcome to Flip Your Wig, Gay-Nerds’ biweekly column that highlights music by members of the LGBT community and their allies. This week marks the release of Thursday’s sixth full length album, No Devolución. Since the band strives to make the underground music community a constructive place and tackled issues that most bands wouldn’t think of giving a single thought, I decided to do a full retrospective of the band’s work before sharing my thoughts of their latest.

Still Wearing Black on the Outside Because They Feel Everything on the Inside

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Flip Your Wig – R.E.M. “Collapse Into Now”

Welcome to Flip Your Wig, Gay-Nerds’ biweekly column dedicated to musicians of the LGBT community and their allies. This week we’re going to look into the latest entry of living legends R.E.M.’s latest album “Collapse Into Now”. Will it turn you inside out, or is it just a pale imitation of the life found on their prior masterpieces?

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Flip Your Wig – R.E.M. "Collapse Into Now"

Welcome to Flip Your Wig, Gay-Nerds’ biweekly column dedicated to musicians of the LGBT community and their allies. This week we’re going to look into the latest entry of living legends R.E.M.’s latest album “Collapse Into Now”. Will it turn you inside out, or is it just a pale imitation of the life found on their prior masterpieces?

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Flip Your Wig – Sleater-Kinney “The Woods”

Welcome to Gay-Nerds biweekly review of music made by members of the GLBT community and their allies. This week, we’re taking a look at the final bow by a trio of trailblazing women after a fifteen year career. “The Woods” is an absolute gem because it beautifully captured life in the 21st century while rocking more intelligently and harder than nearly any other record that decade. Oh, did I mention that Sleater-Kinney only needed three women to decimate any other band in their path?

Sleater-Kinney had spent nine years cultivating a respectable underground fanbase with their thought-provoking punk. Whereas other riot grrrl bands alienated listeners with radical, man-hating lyrics, Sleater-Kinney always found a way to strike universal cords with listeners from any walk of life. Always the active, aching observer, Sleater-Kinney wrote crisp satire and documents of their world on the backdrop of buzzsaw guitars and gorgeous vocal harmonies. Each release saw the women tackle sexual and gender politics, relationships, government hypocrisies and everyday life without adhering to any sort of punk-rock dogma. When you listen to Sleater-Kinney, you absorb their lives rather than the life of a “punk” or “woman”. As the years passed, Sleater-Kinney’s musical palate began to incorporate more restrained structures and intricate arrangements without losing any sense of accessibility or urgency; seventies pop rock and 80s jangle pop would find their way between furious drumming and angelic dual part harmonies. No one really knew what to expect from The Woods other than that it would be different.

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Flip Your Wig – Sleater-Kinney "The Woods"

Welcome to Gay-Nerds biweekly review of music made by members of the GLBT community and their allies. This week, we’re taking a look at the final bow by a trio of trailblazing women after a fifteen year career. “The Woods” is an absolute gem because it beautifully captured life in the 21st century while rocking more intelligently and harder than nearly any other record that decade. Oh, did I mention that Sleater-Kinney only needed three women to decimate any other band in their path?

Sleater-Kinney had spent nine years cultivating a respectable underground fanbase with their thought-provoking punk. Whereas other riot grrrl bands alienated listeners with radical, man-hating lyrics, Sleater-Kinney always found a way to strike universal cords with listeners from any walk of life. Always the active, aching observer, Sleater-Kinney wrote crisp satire and documents of their world on the backdrop of buzzsaw guitars and gorgeous vocal harmonies. Each release saw the women tackle sexual and gender politics, relationships, government hypocrisies and everyday life without adhering to any sort of punk-rock dogma. When you listen to Sleater-Kinney, you absorb their lives rather than the life of a “punk” or “woman”. As the years passed, Sleater-Kinney’s musical palate began to incorporate more restrained structures and intricate arrangements without losing any sense of accessibility or urgency; seventies pop rock and 80s jangle pop would find their way between furious drumming and angelic dual part harmonies. No one really knew what to expect from The Woods other than that it would be different.