Tag: Music

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Flip Your Wig: Deerhunter “Halcyon Digest”

Welcome to Gay-Nerds biweekly review of music made by members of the GLBT community and their allies. With every New Year’s Day comes the realization that I have been spending the past twelve months living in the mid 1990’s, feeling somewhat guilty about not keeping up with current music. There’s always a week where my hard drive weeps due to the incessant acquisition of new music. Most of it filters through like a hazy dream and I am left grasping a few worthwhile moments before I ultimately forget about it. A few weeks later, the name of the band will pop up and my feelings about their work will intensify, whether lobbing gobs of praise or spewing bile at an entire decade of work. Either way, these feeling are warped well beyond what I may have initially felt when I had actively listened and heard whatever music is debated. These memories are molded into exactly what I want them to be in spite of the reality of the occurrence.

I bring all of this up because the men of Deerhunter spend Halcyon Digest gliding through the bleary etchings of age, memory and time. Entering their second decade together, Deerhunter is about as far removed from the bratty snarl of “Turn it up Faggot” as you could get. Since the loss of Justin Bosthworth, Deerhunter have turned inward, rarely writing lyrics ahead of time while laboring over song structures and demos for ages before recording them. It’s an interesting approach, trying to build a rich backdrop for spur-of-the-moment sincerity. So what happens when they decide to take this approach and magnify and make sense of their past demons and fears?

Deerhunter

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Flip Your Wig: Deerhunter "Halcyon Digest"

Welcome to Gay-Nerds biweekly review of music made by members of the GLBT community and their allies. With every New Year’s Day comes the realization that I have been spending the past twelve months living in the mid 1990’s, feeling somewhat guilty about not keeping up with current music. There’s always a week where my hard drive weeps due to the incessant acquisition of new music. Most of it filters through like a hazy dream and I am left grasping a few worthwhile moments before I ultimately forget about it. A few weeks later, the name of the band will pop up and my feelings about their work will intensify, whether lobbing gobs of praise or spewing bile at an entire decade of work. Either way, these feeling are warped well beyond what I may have initially felt when I had actively listened and heard whatever music is debated. These memories are molded into exactly what I want them to be in spite of the reality of the occurrence.
I bring all of this up because the men of Deerhunter spend Halcyon Digest gliding through the bleary etchings of age, memory and time. Entering their second decade together, Deerhunter is about as far removed from the bratty snarl of “Turn it up Faggot” as you could get. Since the loss of Justin Bosthworth, Deerhunter have turned inward, rarely writing lyrics ahead of time while laboring over song structures and demos for ages before recording them. It’s an interesting approach, trying to build a rich backdrop for spur-of-the-moment sincerity. So what happens when they decide to take this approach and magnify and make sense of their past demons and fears?
Deerhunter

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Flip Your Wig – Torche “Songs for Singles”

Welcome to Gay-Nerds biweekly review of music made by members of the GLBT community and their allies. This week, we’re going to be taking a lot of our community out of their comfort zone and into the world of metal. I was originally thinking about reviewing something by Gorgoroth, but decided that doing so would probably be a bad decision; not only is black metal not my cup of tea, but there’s also the story about their old frontman torturing some dude, draining his blood, and forcing his captive to drink from it. Instead, we’re heading somewhere a bit warmer (Georgia) and less frightening to hear Torche’s new EP “Songs for Singles”.

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Flip Your Wig – Torche "Songs for Singles"

Welcome to Gay-Nerds biweekly review of music made by members of the GLBT community and their allies. This week, we’re going to be taking a lot of our community out of their comfort zone and into the world of metal. I was originally thinking about reviewing something by Gorgoroth, but decided that doing so would probably be a bad decision; not only is black metal not my cup of tea, but there’s also the story about their old frontman torturing some dude, draining his blood, and forcing his captive to drink from it. Instead, we’re heading somewhere a bit warmer (Georgia) and less frightening to hear Torche’s new EP “Songs for Singles”.

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Flip Your Wig – The Wonder Years “The Upsides”

Welcome to Gay-Nerds first edition of Flip Your Wig, a (hopefully) bi-weekly feature on music made by GLBT people or their allies. For my first review, I wanted to find a record that could branch away from the confines of “gay music” but also be an album could resonate with any of our readers no matter what their identity. I couldn’t think of a better album than one of the few pop punk albums of the last decade that could actually save lives.

The Upsides Promo

I was hesitant to listen to this album when it leaked in January. The Wonder Years were a sextet of goofballs from Philly who seemed to be bucking on the recent pop-punk revival for laughs. Somewhere along the way, the band dropped their gimmicky keyboards and got their asses kicked by real life. I was nervous when the faux four-track bedroom recorded vocals cued up, signaling the beginning of what I feared would be standard issue 21st century bloodletting. Oh how wrong I was.

In less than fifteen seconds, The Wonder Years shred any of the self doubt and teenage egocentricism found in the band’s earlier recordings before the rest of the band slams into action, attacking homophobes, social hierarchies, and general scum that clogs the life of the American twenty-something. Rather than revel in emo’s self-deprecation or pop music’s aimlessness, The Wonder Years provide a much needed realist viewpoint to their songwriting. Hundreds and venues and countless blown out tires, panic attacks, and full blown gang riots at shows, The Wonder Years trudged into adulthood. The system idealistic naivete of indestructible youth has realized that it needs support and self-care (Melrose Diner, Hey Thanks) and it sounds downright jubilant.

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Flip Your Wig – The Wonder Years "The Upsides"

Welcome to Gay-Nerds first edition of Flip Your Wig, a (hopefully) bi-weekly feature on music made by GLBT people or their allies. For my first review, I wanted to find a record that could branch away from the confines of “gay music” but also be an album could resonate with any of our readers no matter what their identity. I couldn’t think of a better album than one of the few pop punk albums of the last decade that could actually save lives.

The Upsides Promo

I was hesitant to listen to this album when it leaked in January. The Wonder Years were a sextet of goofballs from Philly who seemed to be bucking on the recent pop-punk revival for laughs. Somewhere along the way, the band dropped their gimmicky keyboards and got their asses kicked by real life. I was nervous when the faux four-track bedroom recorded vocals cued up, signaling the beginning of what I feared would be standard issue 21st century bloodletting. Oh how wrong I was.


In less than fifteen seconds, The Wonder Years shred any of the self doubt and teenage egocentricism found in the band’s earlier recordings before the rest of the band slams into action, attacking homophobes, social hierarchies, and general scum that clogs the life of the American twenty-something. Rather than revel in emo’s self-deprecation or pop music’s aimlessness, The Wonder Years provide a much needed realist viewpoint to their songwriting. Hundreds and venues and countless blown out tires, panic attacks, and full blown gang riots at shows, The Wonder Years trudged into adulthood. The system idealistic naivete of indestructible youth has realized that it needs support and self-care (Melrose Diner, Hey Thanks) and it sounds downright jubilant.